Current Issue

Vol 7 No 3 (2021)
Published: 2021-11-25

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The British Journal for Military History (BJMH) is the scholarly journal of the British Commission for Military History (BCMH) established in support of the Commission’s Object, to ‘promote through research, publication and discussion the understanding of military history in the broadest sense, without restriction as to period or region.’  The BJMH is entirely owned by the BCMH.  The BJMH is a pioneering Open Access, peer-reviewed journal that brings high quality scholarship in military history to an audience beyond academia. 

 

EDITORS SOUGHT

The BJMH is seeking new members of our editiorial team as follows:

  • Book Reviews Editor(s): one or two editors who will liaise with publishers over new books, including arranging for titles of interest to be sent to reviewers, and then liaising with review authors over their reviews through to production stage.
  • Managing Editors: up to five editors who will arrange for the review of submitted articles and then liaise with authors over the editorial process through to production stage.

We are keen to represent the diversity of research on military history and would particularly welcome applicants whose work would further broaden the expertise we have within our editorial team.  Applicants should either have a PhD or have produced other research of similar scholarly standing.

Please ask any questions, and apply by sending a CV (maximum two pages of A4) and a short statement (maximum 250 words) on which role interests you and why, by email to Prof. Richard Grayson (r.grayson@gold.ac.uk) by 1pm GMT on Friday 11th February 2022.

 

NEW MANAGING EDITOR (9th October 2020)

The BJMH is pleased to announce that Dr Rachel Chin has joined our team as a Managing Editor.

  

ADDITIONAL MANAGING EDITORS (4th March 2020)

The BJMH is pleased to announce that Dr William Butler and Dr Yu Suzuki have joined us as Managing Editors.

 

RESEARCH NOTES (2nd March 2020)

We are now accepting 'Research Notes' of between 1,000 and 3,000 words.  These could be, for example: analysis of the significance a newly accessible document or documents; a reinterpretation of a document; or, a discussion of an historical controversy drawing on new research.  Note that all such pieces of work should follow the style guidelines for articles and will be peer reviewed.  Note also that such pieces should not be letters, nor should they be opinion pieces which are not based on new research.